Ebola: The next big frontier for protease inhibitor therapies?

Ebola_virusWhile I was on vacation this summer, the news was full of stories about the Ebola Virus outbreak in Africa and the health workers who had contracted the virus through working with the infected population there. Then on the heels of all of this, comes a very timely paper High Content Image-Based Screening of a Protease Inhibitor Library Reveals Compounds Broadly Active against Rift Valley Fever Virus and Other Highly Pathogenic RNA Viruses in the journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

While the primary pathogen tested in the article is the Rift Valley Fever Virus, the library of protease inhibitors was also screened for efficacy against Ebola Virus and a range of other related RNA viruses, and shown to have activity against those pathogens as well.

Given the incredible successes we have seen with the use of protease inhibitors in other virally induced diseases like HIV/AIDS, it is tempting to wonder whether there might be a similarly promisng new medical frontier for protease inhibitors in the treatment of these extremely dangerous viral hemorrhagic fevers.

Interestingly, most of the compound screening for these kinds of antiviral therapies in the last couple of years, has been focused upon signaling molecules like kinases, phosphatases and G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). The use of protease inhibitors as antiviral compounds therefore, represents something of a departure from the mainstream in this research field. The authors of the current study however, felt that the success of protease inhibitors in the treatment of other diseases, were grounds to merit a study of their efficacy against RNA viruses.

When I think about all of the people who are still alive today thanks to the use of protease inhibitors to control their HIV/AIDS, the early signs of a similarly efficacious class of compounds for treating hemorrhagic fevers, described in this new research article, definitely give one hope for the prospect of a future in which there are successful therapies to treat deadly (and really scary) diseases like Ebola.

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